Birds in the Fog

Image of a painting of a two flying American Crows with a gray background.
Speeding Crows, American Crows #3, 24″ x 24″ acrylic on canvas, $1250
Image of a painting of an American Crow flying with its ghost above a gray background.
Ghost Crow, American Crows #4, 24″ x 24″ acrylic on canvas, $1250
Image of a painting of two Common Ravens on a gray background.
Raven Couple, Common Ravens #4 #3, 24″ x 24″ acrylic on canvas, $1250
Image of a painting of three Acorn Woodpeckers diving against a gray background.
Acorn Woodpeckers Diving, Acorn Woodpeckers #2, 24″ x 24″ acrylic on canvas, $1250
Image of a painting of three Acorn Woodpeckers admiring the vertical flight of a fourth
Acorn Woodpecker with Admirers, 24″ x 24″ acrylic on canvas, $1250
Image of a painting of two Acorn Woodpeckers watching a third mysteriously ascend, painted on a gray backgroujd.
Acorn Woodpecker Ascending, Acorn Woodpecker #4, 24″ x 24″ acrylic on canvas, $1250

Birds In the Night

Image of a painting of a Great Blue heron with a black background.
Great Blue Heron #4, 12″ x 12″ acrylic on canvas. $250
Image of a painting of a Great Blue heron with a black background.
Great Blue Heron #3, 12″ x 12″ acrylic on canvas. $250
Image of a painting of a Great Egret head with a black background.
Great Egret #1, 12″ x 12″ acrylic on canvas. $250
Image of a painting of a Great Egret head with a black background.
Great Egret #2, 12″ x 12″ acrylic on canvas. $250
Image of a painting of an Acorn Woodpecker rising into the left corner of the canvas, against a black background.
Acorn Woodpecker #8, 12″ x 12″ acrylic on canvas, $250
Image of a painting of an Acorn Woodpecker peering up from the right lower corner of the canvas, against a black background.
Acorn Woodpecker #5, 12″ x 12″ acrylic on canvas, $250
Image of a painting of an Acorn Woodpecker diving into the upper left corner of the canvas, against a black background.
Acorn Woodpecker #6, 12” x 12” acrylic on canvas, $250
Image of a painting of an Acorn Woodpecker clinging to the side of the canvas, against a black background.
Acorn Woodpecker #7, 12″ x 12″ acrylic on canvas, $250

“Portraits of Santa Barbara Birds”, Gallery Los Olivos Solo Show, November, 2020

All new paintings, previously unexhibited. I’ll be posting them all below within a week or so. No reception (Covid 19) but I’ll be in the Gallery from 10:00 am-5:00 pm on Sunday November 1, and on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, November 13-15.

Great Blue Heron #5, Acrylic on canvas, 27.5″ x 51.5″ framed. $2,475
Great Egret #3, Acrylic on canvas, 27.5″ x 51.5″ framed. $2,475

Gallery 113 October 2019

Featured Artist for October

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These are all acrylic on 1.5″ canvas, all unframed except that I made a custom frame for the picture above the little table after it was sold. I think they are quite nice either way.

I painted them all in 2019, some as recently as last week, so they are highly representative of my current output

Great Crested Tern #1 at UGallery

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Great Crested Tern #1. 36″ x 48″ x 1.5″ acrylic on canvas $2,325

Lately I’ve been thinking about my long career as an ecologist and climate change scientist and the subtle ways it seems to be driving me to paint seabirds as a sort of antidote to the unrelenting onslaught of bad environmental news. My thoughts were amplified recently on a trip aboard Lindblad Expeditions’ National Geographic Orion from Tahiti, through the Tuamotu Archipelago, to the Marquesas Islands and back. The trip was fantastic.

The atolls we snorkeled and the islands we visited are out of the way, mostly undeveloped, and when populated at all, only lightly, by people living close to the land; no wonder Paul Gauguin chose this place to paint and be buried. The young naturalists on board enthusiastically located, pointed out, and identified nearly every species of coral, fish, and bird with amazing alacrity with little reference to climate change, ocean acidification, overfishing, accumulation of plastic debris, and other environmental ramifications of the growing human population that currently fill the scientific literature. It felt good to celebrate what we have rather than bemoan what has been lost, and it is the business of cruises like this one to seek out the best wild areas in the world where degradation is minimal.

Approaching Mo’orea near the end of the trip I spent hours photographing Great Crested Terns swooping from 50 feet above the bow waves to pick flying fish from the air as they tried to avoid what must have seemed like a very large predator. These large terns fly so fast and change direction so abruptly that they are hard to photograph, but when you get one in focus they are compelling.